Saturday, 27 June 2015

The Picot Bind-Off: It's a love-hate relationship

I'm in the process of finishing the Picot Pi and (as the name suggests) I'm binding off picot-style. At over one thousand stitches, this is a lengthy and repetitive process. But, the end result will be worth the wait.

Picot literally means 'small loop' and describes the bobbles at the cast-off edge, which are produced by adding more stitches immediately before binding off. Incorporating the picot bind-off will result in a very flexible, wider garment at the outer edge of the piece. In other words, it adds drape.

Picot Bind-Off Detail for Ammonite 

Sunday, 14 June 2015

Design Digest: Revisiting the Ammonite Prototype

Following a few enquiries from the knittersphere regarding the prototype Ammonite in grey, which eventually evolved into the Ammonite pattern, I finally found the time to write up my recollections, which might help with the queries I recently received. 

Apologies for such a late response to all those who got in touch!

Ammonite Mark 2 Pattern instructions available here

Ammonite Mark 3, Project Notes are available here

Unfortunately, I didn't take any notes when knitting my freestyle Ammonite prototype. Below you will find some pointers, which might be useful, should you wish to achieve a different appearance from the final Ammonite pattern: 


Freestyle Ammonite


Sunday, 7 June 2015

The Weekly Swatch: Fisherman's Rib Stitch




Fisherman's Rib is one my all-time favourite stitches. Primarily used for thick and stretchy garments, the motif can either be achieved by picking up yarn and wrapping it round the needle followed by decreasing; or by knitting into the stitch directly below the knit stitch and purling the following stitch. For the sample below, I used the latter method.

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