Showing posts with label Commuter Knit. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Commuter Knit. Show all posts

Monday, 8 June 2015

The Picot Pi in Progress

In line with my latest obsession with Elizabeth Zimmermann's knitwear designs, I find myself  knitting my own variation of her Pi Shawl pattern / knit recipe



Sunday, 16 November 2014

New Free Pattern: The Commuter Cowl

Evening Rush Hour London Victoria

Another experiment in simple lace knitting. This project was conceived of and completed during the daily commute and that's how it came to its name, the Commuter Cowl. 

The cowl's lace pattern gives the impression of vertical ribbing, which is achieved by a simple lace sequence, ideal for beginner lace knitters.

The project is extremely portable and the pattern's lace rows are followed by simple knit rows, making this an ideal beginner project. The cowl is knitted entirely in the round.


Saturday, 15 November 2014

Update on that "Bag of Weed"

My so-called "sabbatical" ended unexpectedly at the onset of October. This accounts for the silence on the blog, which I'm about to interrupt with a post on blocking.

Blocking again! I don't seem to be able to get away from the topic of blocking.

Commuter Cowl blocking, draped around dressmaker's dummy

Saturday, 2 August 2014

A Sneak Peek of the New Pattern

At the moment it's still unblocked, but here is a preview of my new pattern, the Commuter Cowl. The pattern should be available on the blog by the beginning of September.

Commuter Cowl in Araucania Botany Lace

I used approximately half a skein of Araucania Botany Lace.

More information on Botany Lace is available here.


Sunday, 11 May 2014

The Freestyle Raglan Cardigan - Project Instructions

Surprisingly pleased with my first freestyle raglan cardigan, I decided to knit another, this time keeping a record of my project instructions.



Knitted seamlessly from the top down, this is a made to measure project without a written pattern as such. 

The number of cast - on stitches depends on your gauge swatch, your own measurements, the chosen needle size and the type of wool you are using. The pattern allows for modifications at every step of the way and what follows are my instructions for a cardigan in size S, knitted in stockinette stitch, with garter stitch edging at the bottom.

Should you wish to use another stitch motif, you simply have to knit the gauge swatch in the desired stitch and derive your measurements from your test swatch.






I used the following materials:

  • Yarn: Madelinetosh, Tosh Merino Light (Sock Yarn) - 1 hank

  • Needle: 5mm (US size 8) circular needle, 4 double - pointed needles (5mm / US size 8)

  • Scrap yarn, 4 stitch markers, scissors, darning needle 



Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light Sock Yarn, Colourway: Victorian Gothic



Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light Sock Yarn, Colourway: Victorian Gothic


Prepare your gauge swatch and block it in whichever way you see fit. Count the stitches and calculate the number of stitches against the measurement of the gauge swatch: In my gauge swatch, 26 stitches in stockinette stitch measured 10cm exactly. 


Gauge swatch in stockinette stitch.



Next, you will have to determine how many stitches are required for the neckline of your cardigan. You can either measure yourself or, as this is not always as straightforward, opt to measure the neckline of an existing garment. My neckline measurement was 51cm.

Once you have determined the neckline measurement, you calculate the number of stitches to be cast on proportionally:

The general calculation looks as follows:

(measurement of desired neckline x number of stitches in swatch sample) / measurement of swatch = number of required stitches 

For my cardigan, the calculation looks like this: 

(51cm x 26sts) / 10cm = 132.6sts


I rounded the stitch total to 135, in order to easily divide the stitches between the various sections.


Once you have determined the number of stitches required, you are ready to start knitting:



Cast on 135 stitches:

  • 1st row: knit all stitches
  • 2nd row: purl all stitches

(After completion of this row, I decided to incorporate a button hole at the beginning of the next row, but this is entirely optional.)

Next, divide stitches between markers for the front, back and the two sleeve sections: 

  • 45 for the back section, 46 in total for the front sections and 22 stitches for each sleeve section
  • 3rd row: knit 23, place marker, knit 22, place marker, knit 45, place marker, knit 22, place marker, knit 23
  • 4th row: purl, slipping markers as you complete the row

From the next row onwards, you start the Raglan increases. Until you are able to fit your arms comfortably through the sleeve sections, the number of stitches will have to be increased as set out below.

  • 5th row: knit to two stitches before 1st marker, kfb, knit, slip marker, kfb, knit to two stitches before next marker. Continue increasing the stitch count as set-out above until the row row is complete, increasing one stitch before and after each marker.
  • 6th row: purl all stitches slipping markers as you complete the row


Continue in stockinette stitch, increasing stitches before and after each marker on every knit row as shown above.

Continue knitting in stockinette stitch until your arms fit through the sleeves. (I increased the sleeve sections from 22 stitches to a total of 45 stitches between markers.) 

When the sleeves are wide enough and the fit is comfortable, proceed as follows:

  • Knit to 1st marker, remove marker, place all stitches between markers on scrap yarn. Remove second marker. Join first front section with back section, continue knitting to second sleeve section, remove first marker, place stitches between markers on scrap yarn, remove second marker, join back section with second front section. Proceed to knit until end of row. 


Proceed to knit in stockinette stitch, removing all markers until your cardigan has reached the desired length. (You will have to keep checking the fit of the cardigan whilst knitting.)

Once your cardigan has reached the desired length, knit 4 rows in plain garter stitch (to avoid rolled edges) and bind off.






Having completed the Torso, it's time to move on to the sleeves: 

As pictured above, the live sleeve stitches are held on scrap yarn. Divide these stitches evenly between 3 double - pointed needles and remove the scrap yarn. To give the sleeves a neater look and to avoid the appearance of "underarm holes", pick up a few stitches underneath the arms, where the front and back sections were originally joined. This will stabilise the sleeve and create an overall tidy appearance.

It is now up to you to decide, how long the sleeves should be. As I wanted to use one skein of sock yarn exactly, I settled for short sleeves, which only required me to knit three rows in the round until bind-off. 

Once you have completed the sleeves, your cardigan is ready to be blocked.

As this garment is knitted in one piece, blocking can be quite a challenge and I decided to pin it against my dressmaker's dummy, whilst steam - blocking the fabric.  






Should you require pattern support, please feel free to contact me via Ravelry or leave a comment below.

This pattern is for personal use only and may not be reproduced for commercial purposes without permission.


© 2012 Clarice Asquith. All rights reserved. http://makedoandmendnovice.blogspot.com



Sunday, 23 March 2014

Substituting Rowan Kidsilk Haze (again)

Introducing the Wisp

The pattern was created by Canadian designer Cheryl Niamath and originally published in Knitty's summer 2007 edition.  The pattern instructions call for either Elann Super Kydd or Rowan Kidsilk Haze. As I have successfully substituted Rowan Kidsilk Haze with Patons UK Misty in a previous project, I decided to use Patons UK Misty for my Wisp. And once again, Misty didn't disappoint.
  
Unfortunately, Misty has by now been discontinued, but it can occassionally be found for sale on both ebay and ravelry. Misty's composition (70% Mohair, 30% Polyamide) is not as luxurious as Kidsilk's but it serves as a fantastic substitute for all Knitters, who want to work with fingering weight yarn without having to pay the price for Kidsilk Haze, which currently retails at just under £9.00 per ball.


Wisp (Yarn: Patons UK Misty, substituting Rowan Kidsilk Haze)

Saturday, 22 March 2014

There and Back Again....

Gallery of a Public Transport Knitter





Some Vital Statistics

Excluding the London Underground network, 2.5 million people commute to work by rail in the United Kingdom every day. More than a third of those commute to work to and from London. With a population of 13,614,409, the London commuter belt, which is also defined as the Southeast Metropolitan Area, is the largest in the European Union. The geographical boundaries of the Southeast Metropolitan Area are in constant flux. As the urban sprawl continues ever on and transport links are improved or created, it is expected to further expand.

My stretch of the line is operated by Southeastern. 70% of Southeastern's services transport passengers from Kent and parts of East Sussex to the major London termini. On their website Southeastern claim to be transporting 570,000 commuters to the capital every weekday morning. I happen to be one of them.




Sunday, 2 March 2014

Catching up with the Finished Objects...

Hane Scarf, Yarn: Rowan RYC Bamboo Soft


For the first time, I find myself in the position of having to catch up on blogging about my finished objects, as my knitting activity seems to have increased dramatically over the last six months; and there are a number of projects that deserve to be included on the blog.

On average, it appears that I manage to complete a project every fortnight. No doubt, this is a result of my rigorous knitting activity whilst going about my daily commute. (If I didn't use the needles to knit, I might feel tempted to try them out on fellow commuters...)



Hane Scarf, Yarn: Rowan RYC Bamboo Soft


Sunday, 6 October 2013

Noro Bias Lace Scarf in a Less Than Posh Yarn

Bias Lace 

Another project, completed entirely during the daily commute. It turned out to be an excellent commuter knit for several reasons:




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