Showing posts with label Knitting Projects - Easy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Knitting Projects - Easy. Show all posts

Thursday, 17 May 2012

Design Digest: Ammonite - Part 2

... in which, amongst other things, she talks about sock yarn, choosing a knitting project to suit your mood and the skill level required to knit an Ammonite.


When approaching a design, simplicity is sometimes best. I suppose this is the essence of my previous post on designing Ammonite. Once I had accepted this simple, yet fundamental rule, the design process assumed its own momentum. However, as already mentioned in Part I of my design digest, the first knitted sample turned out to resemble an Elizabethan collar rather than a generously sized, ruffled shawl.

Ammonite: First Test - Knit


This was clearly down to my choice of yarn and a kfb - increase bonanza. Repeated attempts of ironing these faults out with the help of prolonged and intense blocking, yielded only very limited results and did not really seem to make much of an impact overall. It soon dawned on me that I needed to have a rethink on my choice of yarn and moderate my use of increases.

In the first instance I had a look at my stash, which was lacking sock yarn at the time. I briefly contemplated knitting a second Ammonite in Patons UK Misty, but decided against it in the end. I felt that cobweb - type mohair yarn would not give sufficient expression to the ribbed texture of the stitch motif. The answer, obviously, was to use sock yarn and so I went yarn shopping. Joy! (No, this time I really had to...;-) Of course, I had seen some very enticing sock yarns (100g @ £15.00) and even though these looked tempting, I decided to settle on a less costly alternative for two reasons:

Firstly, my pattern required a fair quantity of yarn, approximately 300g to be precise. And secondly, I did not want to overspend on materials, not knowing whether my pattern would actually be right for the materials chosen.

Mietze ... inspecting again

Friday, 4 May 2012

Design Digest: Ammonite - Part I


Ammonite and the Grey Cone...

If you are reading this post, I suppose you have seen Ammonite on Ravelry or on Flickr and you might want to know a little more about the design process and my inspiration for the pattern. Perhaps you have merely stumbled upon this blog because you are interested in knitwear design or maybe good, old Google directed you to this page because you are interested in fossils.



If you are looking for fossil - related information (and I don't mean the knitted kind), I have to disappoint you, as I am going to talk about a knitting pattern and, unless you are interested in knitting, what follows will not be a great deal of help to you.

So, Ammonite...It's probably best to start at the beginning. Roughly a year ago I was browsing in a local charity shop and found a cone of grey DK - weight yarn. There was no further information regarding the identity of the yarn, only a label inside the cone stating it was an acrylic / wool mix (30% wool, 70% acrylic). Having done a bit of research, I now believe that the yarn was manufactured by Yeoman Yarns in Yorkshire, an interesting yarn manufacturer, especially for the thrifty knitters amongst us. Yeoman's yarns come wrapped around cones, presumably targeting machine knitters. (And the big advantage of yarn on cones is of course the fact that you won't run out of yarn during your project.)

Mietze inspecting 

As this poor, grey cone was looking a little lonely, I decided to buy it at a bargain price together with two others, one in heather and another in a light creamy brown. The lovely people at the shop must have been glad to see them go and included a pair of knitting needles at the till. 

Here I was with my yarn bargains. I took them home, where they were subjected to the usual "scratch and sniff " inspection by a member of the feline quality control squad. 

Grey Cone and Friends

Saturday, 28 April 2012

Ammonite


Ammonite


Ammonite in Knitglobal 4 ply sock yarn




Ammonite is a generously sized, semi – circular, ruffled shawl. The garment is knit from the centre top downwards / outwards, making the size easily adjustable by adding or omitting sections when knitting the body of the shawl. For a shawl measuring the same size as given in this pattern, you will require approximately 290g (just under three hanks) of 4ply Knitglobal sock yarn. The project is also suitable for yarns of different weight. Should you wish to substitute yarn and depending on the effect you are seeking to create, the needle size has to be adjusted accordingly.

A gallery of Ammonites in a variety of yarns is available here.





The body of the shawl features a simple cartridge rib stitch, giving the garment a subtle texture that blends into its semi – circular shape, whilst the top outer edge is worked in garter stitch throughout. Kfb increases are utilised to give the shawl a ruffled look. The bottom outer edge of the shawl is worked in stockinette stitch. This is followed by a playful picot border, adding further drape.

I got the idea for the name when I was in the process of completing the first test knit of the pattern. As I was binding off more and more stitches, the garment slowly started to resemble an Ammonite.

Prototype of Ammonite in generic DK weight yarn




  • Size:
One size – Adjustable by adding or omitting pattern repeats, when working the body of the shawl.

  • Finished Measurements:
Length of straight edge - 1.55m

Height at centre - 0.68m

(Note: Measurements were taken after the shawl was blocked.)

  • Yarn:
Knitglobal 4 ply Sock Yarn - (25% nylon, 75% superwash wool) 437yds / 400m per 100g hank

Colour: Plum

Quantity required: Just under three skeins / app. 290grams

  • Recommended Needle Size:
US#6 / 4mm circular needle

  • Other Materials / Tools:
One darning needle and two stitchmarkers.


  • Gauge:
24 stitches / 30 rows: 4'' in cartridge rib stitch



Cartridge Rib Stitch Detail


Cartridge Rib Stitch:

Row 1 : Knit        Row 7: Knit
Row 2: Purl         Row 8: Purl
Row 3: Knit         Row 9: Knit
Row 4: Knit         Row 10: Knit
Row 5: Purl         Row 11: Purl
Row 6: Knit         Row 12: Knit





Directions:


Shawl Centre

Cast - on 4 stitches, using the provisional (invisible) cast - on.

Rows 1 - 8: Knit


Row 9: Following completion of row 8, do not turn piece. Instead, turn work on right hand needle 90 degrees clockwise. With left - hand needle pick up and knit 4 stitches from the garter knots on the edge of the piece. Once these stitches have been knit, you should have a total of 8 stitches on the right hand needle. Turn piece on right hand needle once again by 90 degrees clockwise. Remove waste yarn from provisional cast – on edge and transfer all stitches to the left hand needle. Knit the 4 remaining stitches. 12 stitches are now on the right hand needle. Continue as follows:


Row 1[RS]: k4, pm, k4, pm, k4

Row 2 [WS]: k4, sm, p4, sm, k4

Row 3: k4, sm, [k1, yo] 3 times, k1, sm, k4. 15 sts

Row 4: k4, sm, p7, sm, k4

Row 5: k4, sm, k7, sm, k4

Row 6: k4, sm, p7, sm, k4

Row 7: k4, sm, kfb in each st to next marker, sm, k4. 22 sts

Row 8: k4, sm, p14, sm, k4

Row 9: k4, sm, k14, sm, k4

Row 10: k4, sm, p14, sm, k4




Shawl Body


  • Note: Whilst the first and last four stitches on every row are knit throughout to produce a garter stitch edge, all stitches between the garter stitch edge are worked in cartridge rib stitch. In the following directions, “working in pattern” means to knit in cartridge rib stitch. Instructions for the cartridge rib stitch are set out above.
  • All increases will take place on row 10 of every section.



1st Section:

Row 1 [RS]: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 2 [WS]: k4, sm, p to next maker, sm, k4
Row 3: k4, sm, K to next marker, sm, k4
Row 4: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 5: k4, sm, p to next maker, sm, k4
Row 6: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 7: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 8: k4, sm, p to next maker, sm, k4
Row 9: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 10: k4, sm, kfb in each st to next marker, sm, k4. 36 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p28, sm, k4
Row 12: k4, sm, k28, sm, k4

2nd Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, kfb in each st to next marker, sm, k4. 64 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p56 to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k56 to next marker, sm, k4.

3rd Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k2, [k1, kfb] 13 times, [kfb, k1] 13 times to final two stitches before marker, k2, sm, k4. 90 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p82 to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k82 to next marker, sm, k4.

4th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k2, [k2, kfb] 13 times, [kfb, k2] to final two stitches before marker, k2, sm, k4. 116 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p108 to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k108 to next marker, sm, k4.

5th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k3, [k2, kfb] 17 times, [kfb, k2] to final three stitches before marker, k3, sm, k4. 150 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p142 to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 142 to next marker, sm, k4.


6th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k3, [k3, kfb] 17 times, [kfb, k3] to final 3 stitches before marker, k3, sm, k4. 184 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p176, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 176 to next marker, sm, k4.


7th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k4, [k3, kfb] 21 times, [kfb, k3] 21 times to final 4 stitches before marker, k4, sm, k4. 226 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 218, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 218, sm, k4.

8th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k4, [k4, kfb] 21 times, [kfb, k4] 21 times to final 4 stitches before marker, k4, sm, k4. 268 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 260, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 260, sm, k4.

9th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k5, [k4, kfb] 25 times, [kfb, k4] 25 times to final 5 stitches before marker, k5, sm, k4. 318 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 310, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k310, sm, k4.

10th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k5, [k5, kfb] 25 times, [kfb, k5] 25 times to final 5 stitches before marker, k5, sm, k4. 368 sts.
Row 11: k4, sm, p 360, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 360, sm, k4.

11th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k6, [k5, kfb] 29 times, [kfb, k5] 29 times to final 6 stitches before marker, k6, sm, k4. 426 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 418, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 418, sm, k4.



12th Section:

Rows 1 - 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k6, [k6, kfb] 29 times, [kfb, k6] 29 times to final 6 stitches before marker, k 6, sm, k4. 484 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 476, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 476, sm, k4.

13th Section:

Rows 1 - 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k7, [k6, kfb) 33 times, [kfb, k6] 33 times to final 7 stitches before marker, k7, sm, k4. 550 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 542, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 542, sm, k4.


14th Section:

Rows 1 - 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k7, [k7, kfb] 33 times, [kfb, k7] 33 times to final 7 stitches before marker, k7, sm, k4. 616 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 600, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 600, sm, k4.



15th Section:

Rows 1 - 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k8, [k7, kfb] 37 times, [kfb, k7] 37 times to final 8 stitches before marker, k8, sm, k4. 690 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 682, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 682, sm, k4.







Stockinette Edging

Once Row 12 of Section 15 has been completed, continue in stockinette stitch for 13 rows as follows:

Row 1 [WS]: k4, sm, p to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 2 [RS]: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4.
Rows 3 – 13: Continue in pattern (stockinette stitch) as outlined in Row 1 and 2, purling all stitches between the markers on uneven rows and knitting all stitches on even rows.
Row 13 [WS]: k4, sm, p to next marker, sm, k4.

Proceed to bind off.



Picot Bind - Off  Detail



Picot Bind – Off

*Using the cable cast – on, cast - on two stitches. Next, bind off three stitches. Return the single stitch on the right hand needle back on to the left hand needle. Repeat from *. Continue until all remaining stitches have been bound off.


Finishing:

Using a darning needle, weave in ends. Wash the finished garment and block.





List of abbreviations:

co – cast - on
k – knit
kfb – knit in front and back of stitch
p – purl
pm – place marker
sm – slip marker
st – stitch
sts - stitches
yo – yarn over

More information on designing Ammonite is available here.


Should you require pattern support, please feel free to contact me via Ravelry or leave a comment below.

This pattern is for personal use only and may not be reproduced for commercial purposes without permission.



© 2012 Clarice Asquith. All rights reserved. http://makedoandmendnovice.blogspot.com


Monday, 2 January 2012

Citron - Finally Finished

Citron in Patons UK Misty

It's taken a fair bit of time to complete this project, three months to be precise. Nevertheless, Citron, a semi - circular shawlette, is finally finished. The pattern designer is Hilary Smith Callis and written instructions can be found in the winter 2009 edition of Knitty


For this project I decided to attack my stash of Patons UK Misty, which I bought as a substitute for Rowan Kidsilk Haze. (More on substituting Rowan Kidsilk Haze with Patons UK Misty can be found in a previous blogpost.)



Citron in Patons UK Misty

On the whole, I am happy with the yarn, even though it split unexpectedly on two occasions, but this was easily rectified.

Wednesday, 9 November 2011

Another Project: The Knitted Cat Tunnel

When visiting a friend, I observed her cats diving in and out of a polyester / nylon cat tunnel. Our cats can also be found playing in enclosed spaces, especially underneath duvets and  blankets. When I saw how much her cats enjoyed playing in the tunnel, I contemplated purchasing one for ours, but on second thoughts I found  the material of the so-called cat caves, which are either made from nylon or polyester, somewhat off - putting. Given the choice, I knew that Pickle et al. would prefer hiding and resting in a cozy, knitted object. After all, they choose to fall asleep on my knitting projects. And so the idea for a knitted cat tunnel was born.

Cat Tunnel in Sirdar Big Softie

The following is not so much a knitting pattern, rather a description of my project in stages. It is suitable for the beginner knitter, as it only requires knowledge of a few knitting basics:
  • You will need to be able to cast on and off.
  • You should feel reasonably comfortable knitting on circular needles.
  • You need to be familar with the knit stitch.


Cat Tunnel in progress.


I used the following materials:

  • Bulky yarn of your choice. For my project I used approximately 10 skeins of Sirdar Big Softie. This included the yarn needed to sew in the plastic tubing at either end of the tunnel. As this project is a great exercise in stash busting, you could use yarn leftovers, provided they are of similar thickness.


    Knitted Cat Tunnel in Sirdar Big Softie

  • 10mm circular knitting needles (US size 15).

  • 10mm crochet hook (US size N/15) for finishing, sewing in yarn ends and incorporating the plastic tubing. (This can also be done with a large darning needle.)

  • Plastic tubing approximately as thick as a standard garden hose (see picture below), available at hardware stores. The length of the tubing is dependent on the circumference at the openings of the tunnel, and I would recommend buying the tubing, once you have completed knitting the tunnel and taken actual measurements of the openings.

  • Tape measure, scissors and a Stanley knife (for cutting the plastic tubing).

  • Two wooden plugs or sturdy parcel tape to join the plastic tubing

  • At least one playful feline, who will appreciate your crafting efforts.


    Pebble checking on progress


Instructions for a giant slouchy cat tunnel (40cm wide and 70cm long):

Begin by casting on 90 stitches using whichever method you prefer. (I used the cable cast on.) If you want a wider tunnel, cast on more stitches. If you want a smaller tunnel, reduce the amount of cast on stitches accordingly.

Place marker to mark the beginning of the round and join. 

Knit mindlessly until the tunnel has the desired length. My tunnel is approximately 70cm long and 40cm wide.

Proceed to bind off all stitches and weave in ends.

After you have finished knitting, you may wish to block the piece in order to stretch and straighten the material. I skipped this part.

Measure the circumference of the tunnel openings at either end to determine the required length of the plastic tubing. The plastic tubing I have chosen has the thickness of a domestic garden hose. 

Once you have cut the tubing to size with a Stanley knife, the ends of the tube have to be joined to form a circle. This can be achieved by glueing the ends together with sturdy parcel tape. Alternatively, you can join the ends with the help of a wooden plug, which will ensure a snug fit. (See picture below.) Before fitting the plug, briefly insert the tubes into hot water. This will cause the plastic to expand and the plug can be inserted easily. When the plastic has cooled down, the plug should fit tightly.






When the ends of the tube have been joined, proceed to sew the tube circles into the edges of the knitted tube, using the rolled up edges of the fabric as a guide.  








Having followed these steps, your cat tunnel is ready to be enjoyed destroyed (for your cats' safety obviously only under the supervision of a responsible human).


And here are a few impressions of how the tunnel was received by Pickle, Mietze and Pebble: 


Mietze enjoyed it as a seating facility until she was disturbed by Pebble.














    Monday, 13 June 2011

    Meandering Vines

    It's off the needles, it's finished blocking and here it is....

    Meandering Vines in Paton's UK Vintage











    For further blog entries about the project, please look here (on blocking 


    P.S. Now that I am the proud owner of a shawl, I will need to source a shawl pin.


    Sunday, 12 June 2011

    Meandering Vines by Susanna IC - Almost Finished...

    According to an earlier blog entry, I began to work on "Meandering Vines" back in March 2011. It seems so long ago and I started several other projects whilst knitting the shawl.  

    Meandering Vines


    Finally, after three months of knitting on and off, it is finished. Well, ... almost finished. It's currently blocking. The shawl is knitted in a relatively thick cotton / acrylic yarn (Paton's UK Vintage) and blocking was an absolute must on this project.

    The pattern is simple and straightforward, and, as promised by the designer, it can be knit in pretty much every type of yarn.  -   An easy knit for the beginner lace knitter.

    My blocking method is a little quirky (see below). I neither own a blocking board, which would accommodate the full length of the shawl, nor do I have blocking pins, which would be strong enough to hold the fabric in place.

    Meandering Vines in Patons UK Vintage - Blocking in Progress


    Meandering Vines in Patons UK Vintage - Blocking in Progress


    After some deliberation I decided to suspend the shawl with the help of two pegged coat - hangers from the top shelf of the wardrobe. The triangular corners on either side of the shawl are fastened to both sides of the wardrobe with the help of some scrap yarn (inserted in the eyelet stitches and then tied to the sides of the wardrobe). A further two coat hangers keep the garment in place at the bottom of the wardrobe.

    Once this arrangement was in place, I lightly misted the garment with cold water.

    Pictures of the blocked garment can be found here.

    Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...