Showing posts with label Shawl. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Shawl. Show all posts

Wednesday, 2 September 2015

OMG it's huge: The Picot Pi is finally blocking

A long overdue update on the Picot Pi


It's finally blocking. And, as expected, it's huge.

Bed vs Picot Pi: 


Picot Pi Blocking



Detailed pattern notes will be up on the blog shortly. More information on the project is available here.


Picot Pi Lace Detail

Saturday, 22 August 2015

Cast-on loosely and don't knit tight - knitting lace with fingering weight mohair yarn

Wisp: Pattern by Cheryl Niamath (published in Knitty, Summer 2007), Yarn: Patons UK Misty


The Wisp Shawl pattern by Cheryl Niamath has somewhat turned into a classic lace knitting pattern and due to its simplicity it tends to attract many beginner lace knitters, who may never have used cobweb or fingering weight yarn in any of their projects before.

Though not my first lace project, I, too, opted for the pattern as I wanted to gain experience knitting lace with fingering weight yarn, whilst completing a relatively simple pattern. Niamath's Wisp fulfils these requirements and due to its straightforward stitch sequence, it allows you to concentrate on your manual ability and, above all, to get a feel for working with extremely fine yarn. 


Sunday, 26 July 2015

Going Full Circle: The Picot Pi Shawl is OFF THE NEEDLES


According to Elizabeth Zimmermann, we should be knitting circular shawls during the summer months, and that's exactly what I have done. Below is a first glimpse of my Pi Shawl variation, based on Zimmermann's timeless Pi Shawl pattern.



I haven't counted the picot bobbles of my Pi and keeping track of the exact stitch count in the final stages of my pattern is not essential, but I estimate that the Picot Pi's final bind-off row consisted of over three thousand stitches, when including the additional cast-on stitches. More on the Picot bind-off technique is available here

The completion of the knit was further delayed by having to find a more or less suitable yarn substitute for Regia (4 ply silk), as I was running out shortly after starting the last row. And although my knitting cupboard is home to many treasures, it may at times take a while to retrieve these. It appears somewhat crammed in there at the moment.


Pickle invading the cupboard and getting comfy...as usual

Saturday, 27 June 2015

The Picot Bind-Off: It's a love-hate relationship

I'm in the process of finishing the Picot Pi and (as the name suggests) I'm binding off picot-style. At over one thousand stitches, this is a lengthy and repetitive process. But, the end result will be worth the wait.

Picot literally means 'small loop' and describes the bobbles at the cast-off edge, which are produced by adding more stitches immediately before binding off. Incorporating the picot bind-off will result in a very flexible, wider garment at the outer edge of the piece. In other words, it adds drape.

Picot Bind-Off Detail for Ammonite 

Saturday, 23 May 2015

A Tribute to Elizabeth Zimmermann's Pi

In an earlier post on Elizabeth Zimmermann's Knitter's Almanac, I outlined why I believe that Zimmermann's no-frills paperback should be considered a very special publication indeed, despite its somewhat bland appearance and apparent lack of project photography. 

First up, a few words on the low-cost nature of the paperback edition: The Almanac features instructions to over 15 patterns (including 4 sweaters) on approximately 150 pages, making this a densely packed publication. With the exception of the book cover, the project photography is in black and white throughout, thus lacking the visual appeal and photographic detail of contemporary knitwear publications. 

In short, the project photography (though decent and undertaken with great care) is by modern standards outdated. As a result, those of us, who derive inspiration from ogling an appealing finished object before casting on, will undoubtedly be disappointed.  To really get in the mood for knitting a Zimmermann pattern from the Almanac, it might be best to start off by trawling the web for pictures of finished Zimmermann projects and adaptations of her original designs. At this point, her true genius will be revealed. The Pi Shawl pattern provides a perfect case in point.  

Zimmermann's Pi Shawl design and instructions have inspired countless knitters to produce a multitude of design variations based upon Zimmermann's original design. The Pi Shawls featured below are merely a small selection of the many outstanding projects on show across the  web. 

Special thanks go to MadKnits, Terhi, Aisling Doonan and Glenna C aka crazyknittinglady  for allowing me to showcase their most amazing, finished Pis here on the blog. Thank you so much! 

For even more Pi inspiration, please visit my Pi Shawl board on Pinterest.


Terhi's Pi, Yarn: Wetterhoff Sivilla and Fiberphile Merino 

Saturday, 28 April 2012

Ammonite


Ammonite


Ammonite in Knitglobal 4 ply sock yarn




Ammonite is a generously sized, semi – circular, ruffled shawl. The garment is knit from the centre top downwards / outwards, making the size easily adjustable by adding or omitting sections when knitting the body of the shawl. For a shawl measuring the same size as given in this pattern, you will require approximately 290g (just under three hanks) of 4ply Knitglobal sock yarn. The project is also suitable for yarns of different weight. Should you wish to substitute yarn and depending on the effect you are seeking to create, the needle size has to be adjusted accordingly.

A gallery of Ammonites in a variety of yarns is available here.





The body of the shawl features a simple cartridge rib stitch, giving the garment a subtle texture that blends into its semi – circular shape, whilst the top outer edge is worked in garter stitch throughout. Kfb increases are utilised to give the shawl a ruffled look. The bottom outer edge of the shawl is worked in stockinette stitch. This is followed by a playful picot border, adding further drape.

I got the idea for the name when I was in the process of completing the first test knit of the pattern. As I was binding off more and more stitches, the garment slowly started to resemble an Ammonite.

Prototype of Ammonite in generic DK weight yarn




  • Size:
One size – Adjustable by adding or omitting pattern repeats, when working the body of the shawl.

  • Finished Measurements:
Length of straight edge - 1.55m

Height at centre - 0.68m

(Note: Measurements were taken after the shawl was blocked.)

  • Yarn:
Knitglobal 4 ply Sock Yarn - (25% nylon, 75% superwash wool) 437yds / 400m per 100g hank

Colour: Plum

Quantity required: Just under three skeins / app. 290grams

  • Recommended Needle Size:
US#6 / 4mm circular needle

  • Other Materials / Tools:
One darning needle and two stitchmarkers.


  • Gauge:
24 stitches / 30 rows: 4'' in cartridge rib stitch



Cartridge Rib Stitch Detail


Cartridge Rib Stitch:

Row 1 : Knit        Row 7: Knit
Row 2: Purl         Row 8: Purl
Row 3: Knit         Row 9: Knit
Row 4: Knit         Row 10: Knit
Row 5: Purl         Row 11: Purl
Row 6: Knit         Row 12: Knit





Directions:


Shawl Centre

Cast - on 4 stitches, using the provisional (invisible) cast - on.

Rows 1 - 8: Knit


Row 9: Following completion of row 8, do not turn piece. Instead, turn work on right hand needle 90 degrees clockwise. With left - hand needle pick up and knit 4 stitches from the garter knots on the edge of the piece. Once these stitches have been knit, you should have a total of 8 stitches on the right hand needle. Turn piece on right hand needle once again by 90 degrees clockwise. Remove waste yarn from provisional cast – on edge and transfer all stitches to the left hand needle. Knit the 4 remaining stitches. 12 stitches are now on the right hand needle. Continue as follows:


Row 1[RS]: k4, pm, k4, pm, k4

Row 2 [WS]: k4, sm, p4, sm, k4

Row 3: k4, sm, [k1, yo] 3 times, k1, sm, k4. 15 sts

Row 4: k4, sm, p7, sm, k4

Row 5: k4, sm, k7, sm, k4

Row 6: k4, sm, p7, sm, k4

Row 7: k4, sm, kfb in each st to next marker, sm, k4. 22 sts

Row 8: k4, sm, p14, sm, k4

Row 9: k4, sm, k14, sm, k4

Row 10: k4, sm, p14, sm, k4




Shawl Body


  • Note: Whilst the first and last four stitches on every row are knit throughout to produce a garter stitch edge, all stitches between the garter stitch edge are worked in cartridge rib stitch. In the following directions, “working in pattern” means to knit in cartridge rib stitch. Instructions for the cartridge rib stitch are set out above.
  • All increases will take place on row 10 of every section.



1st Section:

Row 1 [RS]: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 2 [WS]: k4, sm, p to next maker, sm, k4
Row 3: k4, sm, K to next marker, sm, k4
Row 4: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 5: k4, sm, p to next maker, sm, k4
Row 6: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 7: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 8: k4, sm, p to next maker, sm, k4
Row 9: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 10: k4, sm, kfb in each st to next marker, sm, k4. 36 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p28, sm, k4
Row 12: k4, sm, k28, sm, k4

2nd Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, kfb in each st to next marker, sm, k4. 64 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p56 to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k56 to next marker, sm, k4.

3rd Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k2, [k1, kfb] 13 times, [kfb, k1] 13 times to final two stitches before marker, k2, sm, k4. 90 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p82 to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k82 to next marker, sm, k4.

4th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k2, [k2, kfb] 13 times, [kfb, k2] to final two stitches before marker, k2, sm, k4. 116 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p108 to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k108 to next marker, sm, k4.

5th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k3, [k2, kfb] 17 times, [kfb, k2] to final three stitches before marker, k3, sm, k4. 150 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p142 to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 142 to next marker, sm, k4.


6th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k3, [k3, kfb] 17 times, [kfb, k3] to final 3 stitches before marker, k3, sm, k4. 184 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p176, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 176 to next marker, sm, k4.


7th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k4, [k3, kfb] 21 times, [kfb, k3] 21 times to final 4 stitches before marker, k4, sm, k4. 226 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 218, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 218, sm, k4.

8th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k4, [k4, kfb] 21 times, [kfb, k4] 21 times to final 4 stitches before marker, k4, sm, k4. 268 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 260, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 260, sm, k4.

9th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k5, [k4, kfb] 25 times, [kfb, k4] 25 times to final 5 stitches before marker, k5, sm, k4. 318 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 310, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k310, sm, k4.

10th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k5, [k5, kfb] 25 times, [kfb, k5] 25 times to final 5 stitches before marker, k5, sm, k4. 368 sts.
Row 11: k4, sm, p 360, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 360, sm, k4.

11th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k6, [k5, kfb] 29 times, [kfb, k5] 29 times to final 6 stitches before marker, k6, sm, k4. 426 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 418, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 418, sm, k4.



12th Section:

Rows 1 - 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k6, [k6, kfb] 29 times, [kfb, k6] 29 times to final 6 stitches before marker, k 6, sm, k4. 484 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 476, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 476, sm, k4.

13th Section:

Rows 1 - 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k7, [k6, kfb) 33 times, [kfb, k6] 33 times to final 7 stitches before marker, k7, sm, k4. 550 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 542, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 542, sm, k4.


14th Section:

Rows 1 - 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k7, [k7, kfb] 33 times, [kfb, k7] 33 times to final 7 stitches before marker, k7, sm, k4. 616 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 600, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 600, sm, k4.



15th Section:

Rows 1 - 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k8, [k7, kfb] 37 times, [kfb, k7] 37 times to final 8 stitches before marker, k8, sm, k4. 690 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 682, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 682, sm, k4.







Stockinette Edging

Once Row 12 of Section 15 has been completed, continue in stockinette stitch for 13 rows as follows:

Row 1 [WS]: k4, sm, p to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 2 [RS]: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4.
Rows 3 – 13: Continue in pattern (stockinette stitch) as outlined in Row 1 and 2, purling all stitches between the markers on uneven rows and knitting all stitches on even rows.
Row 13 [WS]: k4, sm, p to next marker, sm, k4.

Proceed to bind off.



Picot Bind - Off  Detail



Picot Bind – Off

*Using the cable cast – on, cast - on two stitches. Next, bind off three stitches. Return the single stitch on the right hand needle back on to the left hand needle. Repeat from *. Continue until all remaining stitches have been bound off.


Finishing:

Using a darning needle, weave in ends. Wash the finished garment and block.





List of abbreviations:

co – cast - on
k – knit
kfb – knit in front and back of stitch
p – purl
pm – place marker
sm – slip marker
st – stitch
sts - stitches
yo – yarn over

More information on designing Ammonite is available here.


Should you require pattern support, please feel free to contact me via Ravelry or leave a comment below.

This pattern is for personal use only and may not be reproduced for commercial purposes without permission.



© 2012 Clarice Asquith. All rights reserved. http://makedoandmendnovice.blogspot.com


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