Showing posts with label lace knitting. Show all posts
Showing posts with label lace knitting. Show all posts

Monday, 7 May 2012

The Weekly Swatch, Part 2 - Butterfly Wing Stitch

I am swatching rather a lot at the moment, as I am in search of new stitch combinations and swatching tends to get the imagination going.

This week, once again in Knitglobal 4 ply sock yarn, I have prepared a little sample of the Butterfly Wing Stitch. 


Butterfly Wing Stitch Sample in Knitglobal 4 ply Sock Yarn (Plum)



Butterfly Wing Stitch

One pattern repeat consists of 12 rows and is worked in multiples of 26 stitches. On uneven rows, i.e. rows 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 within the sequence, all stitches are purled.

R1: Purl all stitches

R2: K1, *M1, sl1, k1, psso, k4, k2tog, k3, M1, k2, M1, k3, sl1 , k1, psso, k4, k2tog, M1, k2, rep from *, on last repeat stitch sequence ends on k1 instead of k2.

R4: K1, *M1, k1, sl1, k1, psso, k2, k2tog, k4, M1, k2, M1, k4, sl 1, k1, psso, k2, k2tog, k1, M1, k2, rep from *,  on last repeat stitch sequence ends on k1 instead of k2.

R6: K1, *M1, k2, sl 1, k1, psso, k2tog, k5, M1, k2, M1, k5, sl 1, k1, psso, k2tog, k2, M1, k2, rep from *,  on last repeat stitch sequence ends on k1 instead of k2.

R8, K1, *M1, k3, sl 1, k1, psso, k4, k2tog, M1, k2, M1, sl 1, k1, psso, k4, k2tog, k3, M1, k2, rep from *,  on last repeat stitch sequence ends on k1 instead of k2.

R10: K1, *M1, k4, sl 1, k1, psso, k2, k2tog, k1, M1, k2, M1, k1, sl 1, k1, psso, k2, k2tog, k4, M1, k2, rep from *,  on last repeat stitch sequence ends on k1 instead of k2.

R12: K1, *M1, k5, sl 1, k1, psso, k2tog, [k2, M1] twice, k2, sl 1, k1, psso, k2tog, k5, M1, k2, rep from *,  on last repeat stitch sequence ends on k1 instead of k2.


Butterfly Wing Stitch Sample in Knitglobal 4 ply Sock Yarn (Plum)

Butterfly Wing Stitch Sample in Knitglobal 4 ply Sock Yarn (Plum)

Friday, 4 May 2012

Design Digest: Ammonite - Part I


Ammonite and the Grey Cone...

If you are reading this post, I suppose you have seen Ammonite on Ravelry or on Flickr and you might want to know a little more about the design process and my inspiration for the pattern. Perhaps you have merely stumbled upon this blog because you are interested in knitwear design or maybe good, old Google directed you to this page because you are interested in fossils.



If you are looking for fossil - related information (and I don't mean the knitted kind), I have to disappoint you, as I am going to talk about a knitting pattern and, unless you are interested in knitting, what follows will not be a great deal of help to you.

So, Ammonite...It's probably best to start at the beginning. Roughly a year ago I was browsing in a local charity shop and found a cone of grey DK - weight yarn. There was no further information regarding the identity of the yarn, only a label inside the cone stating it was an acrylic / wool mix (30% wool, 70% acrylic). Having done a bit of research, I now believe that the yarn was manufactured by Yeoman Yarns in Yorkshire, an interesting yarn manufacturer, especially for the thrifty knitters amongst us. Yeoman's yarns come wrapped around cones, presumably targeting machine knitters. (And the big advantage of yarn on cones is of course the fact that you won't run out of yarn during your project.)

Mietze inspecting 

As this poor, grey cone was looking a little lonely, I decided to buy it at a bargain price together with two others, one in heather and another in a light creamy brown. The lovely people at the shop must have been glad to see them go and included a pair of knitting needles at the till. 

Here I was with my yarn bargains. I took them home, where they were subjected to the usual "scratch and sniff " inspection by a member of the feline quality control squad. 

Grey Cone and Friends

Saturday, 28 April 2012

Ammonite


Ammonite


Ammonite in Knitglobal 4 ply sock yarn




Ammonite is a generously sized, semi – circular, ruffled shawl. The garment is knit from the centre top downwards / outwards, making the size easily adjustable by adding or omitting sections when knitting the body of the shawl. For a shawl measuring the same size as given in this pattern, you will require approximately 290g (just under three hanks) of 4ply Knitglobal sock yarn. The project is also suitable for yarns of different weight. Should you wish to substitute yarn and depending on the effect you are seeking to create, the needle size has to be adjusted accordingly.

A gallery of Ammonites in a variety of yarns is available here.





The body of the shawl features a simple cartridge rib stitch, giving the garment a subtle texture that blends into its semi – circular shape, whilst the top outer edge is worked in garter stitch throughout. Kfb increases are utilised to give the shawl a ruffled look. The bottom outer edge of the shawl is worked in stockinette stitch. This is followed by a playful picot border, adding further drape.

I got the idea for the name when I was in the process of completing the first test knit of the pattern. As I was binding off more and more stitches, the garment slowly started to resemble an Ammonite.

Prototype of Ammonite in generic DK weight yarn




  • Size:
One size – Adjustable by adding or omitting pattern repeats, when working the body of the shawl.

  • Finished Measurements:
Length of straight edge - 1.55m

Height at centre - 0.68m

(Note: Measurements were taken after the shawl was blocked.)

  • Yarn:
Knitglobal 4 ply Sock Yarn - (25% nylon, 75% superwash wool) 437yds / 400m per 100g hank

Colour: Plum

Quantity required: Just under three skeins / app. 290grams

  • Recommended Needle Size:
US#6 / 4mm circular needle

  • Other Materials / Tools:
One darning needle and two stitchmarkers.


  • Gauge:
24 stitches / 30 rows: 4'' in cartridge rib stitch



Cartridge Rib Stitch Detail


Cartridge Rib Stitch:

Row 1 : Knit        Row 7: Knit
Row 2: Purl         Row 8: Purl
Row 3: Knit         Row 9: Knit
Row 4: Knit         Row 10: Knit
Row 5: Purl         Row 11: Purl
Row 6: Knit         Row 12: Knit





Directions:


Shawl Centre

Cast - on 4 stitches, using the provisional (invisible) cast - on.

Rows 1 - 8: Knit


Row 9: Following completion of row 8, do not turn piece. Instead, turn work on right hand needle 90 degrees clockwise. With left - hand needle pick up and knit 4 stitches from the garter knots on the edge of the piece. Once these stitches have been knit, you should have a total of 8 stitches on the right hand needle. Turn piece on right hand needle once again by 90 degrees clockwise. Remove waste yarn from provisional cast – on edge and transfer all stitches to the left hand needle. Knit the 4 remaining stitches. 12 stitches are now on the right hand needle. Continue as follows:


Row 1[RS]: k4, pm, k4, pm, k4

Row 2 [WS]: k4, sm, p4, sm, k4

Row 3: k4, sm, [k1, yo] 3 times, k1, sm, k4. 15 sts

Row 4: k4, sm, p7, sm, k4

Row 5: k4, sm, k7, sm, k4

Row 6: k4, sm, p7, sm, k4

Row 7: k4, sm, kfb in each st to next marker, sm, k4. 22 sts

Row 8: k4, sm, p14, sm, k4

Row 9: k4, sm, k14, sm, k4

Row 10: k4, sm, p14, sm, k4




Shawl Body


  • Note: Whilst the first and last four stitches on every row are knit throughout to produce a garter stitch edge, all stitches between the garter stitch edge are worked in cartridge rib stitch. In the following directions, “working in pattern” means to knit in cartridge rib stitch. Instructions for the cartridge rib stitch are set out above.
  • All increases will take place on row 10 of every section.



1st Section:

Row 1 [RS]: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 2 [WS]: k4, sm, p to next maker, sm, k4
Row 3: k4, sm, K to next marker, sm, k4
Row 4: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 5: k4, sm, p to next maker, sm, k4
Row 6: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 7: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 8: k4, sm, p to next maker, sm, k4
Row 9: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4
Row 10: k4, sm, kfb in each st to next marker, sm, k4. 36 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p28, sm, k4
Row 12: k4, sm, k28, sm, k4

2nd Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, kfb in each st to next marker, sm, k4. 64 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p56 to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k56 to next marker, sm, k4.

3rd Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k2, [k1, kfb] 13 times, [kfb, k1] 13 times to final two stitches before marker, k2, sm, k4. 90 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p82 to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k82 to next marker, sm, k4.

4th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k2, [k2, kfb] 13 times, [kfb, k2] to final two stitches before marker, k2, sm, k4. 116 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p108 to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k108 to next marker, sm, k4.

5th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k3, [k2, kfb] 17 times, [kfb, k2] to final three stitches before marker, k3, sm, k4. 150 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p142 to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 142 to next marker, sm, k4.


6th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k3, [k3, kfb] 17 times, [kfb, k3] to final 3 stitches before marker, k3, sm, k4. 184 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p176, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 176 to next marker, sm, k4.


7th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k4, [k3, kfb] 21 times, [kfb, k3] 21 times to final 4 stitches before marker, k4, sm, k4. 226 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 218, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 218, sm, k4.

8th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k4, [k4, kfb] 21 times, [kfb, k4] 21 times to final 4 stitches before marker, k4, sm, k4. 268 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 260, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 260, sm, k4.

9th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k5, [k4, kfb] 25 times, [kfb, k4] 25 times to final 5 stitches before marker, k5, sm, k4. 318 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 310, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k310, sm, k4.

10th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k5, [k5, kfb] 25 times, [kfb, k5] 25 times to final 5 stitches before marker, k5, sm, k4. 368 sts.
Row 11: k4, sm, p 360, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 360, sm, k4.

11th Section:

Rows 1 – 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k6, [k5, kfb] 29 times, [kfb, k5] 29 times to final 6 stitches before marker, k6, sm, k4. 426 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 418, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 418, sm, k4.



12th Section:

Rows 1 - 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k6, [k6, kfb] 29 times, [kfb, k6] 29 times to final 6 stitches before marker, k 6, sm, k4. 484 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 476, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 476, sm, k4.

13th Section:

Rows 1 - 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k7, [k6, kfb) 33 times, [kfb, k6] 33 times to final 7 stitches before marker, k7, sm, k4. 550 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 542, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 542, sm, k4.


14th Section:

Rows 1 - 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k7, [k7, kfb] 33 times, [kfb, k7] 33 times to final 7 stitches before marker, k7, sm, k4. 616 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 600, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 600, sm, k4.



15th Section:

Rows 1 - 9: Work in pattern.
Row 10: k4, sm, k8, [k7, kfb] 37 times, [kfb, k7] 37 times to final 8 stitches before marker, k8, sm, k4. 690 sts
Row 11: k4, sm, p 682, sm, k4.
Row 12: k4, sm, k 682, sm, k4.







Stockinette Edging

Once Row 12 of Section 15 has been completed, continue in stockinette stitch for 13 rows as follows:

Row 1 [WS]: k4, sm, p to next marker, sm, k4.
Row 2 [RS]: k4, sm, k to next marker, sm, k4.
Rows 3 – 13: Continue in pattern (stockinette stitch) as outlined in Row 1 and 2, purling all stitches between the markers on uneven rows and knitting all stitches on even rows.
Row 13 [WS]: k4, sm, p to next marker, sm, k4.

Proceed to bind off.



Picot Bind - Off  Detail



Picot Bind – Off

*Using the cable cast – on, cast - on two stitches. Next, bind off three stitches. Return the single stitch on the right hand needle back on to the left hand needle. Repeat from *. Continue until all remaining stitches have been bound off.


Finishing:

Using a darning needle, weave in ends. Wash the finished garment and block.





List of abbreviations:

co – cast - on
k – knit
kfb – knit in front and back of stitch
p – purl
pm – place marker
sm – slip marker
st – stitch
sts - stitches
yo – yarn over

More information on designing Ammonite is available here.


Should you require pattern support, please feel free to contact me via Ravelry or leave a comment below.

This pattern is for personal use only and may not be reproduced for commercial purposes without permission.



© 2012 Clarice Asquith. All rights reserved. http://makedoandmendnovice.blogspot.com


Monday, 2 January 2012

Citron - Finally Finished

Citron in Patons UK Misty

It's taken a fair bit of time to complete this project, three months to be precise. Nevertheless, Citron, a semi - circular shawlette, is finally finished. The pattern designer is Hilary Smith Callis and written instructions can be found in the winter 2009 edition of Knitty


For this project I decided to attack my stash of Patons UK Misty, which I bought as a substitute for Rowan Kidsilk Haze. (More on substituting Rowan Kidsilk Haze with Patons UK Misty can be found in a previous blogpost.)



Citron in Patons UK Misty

On the whole, I am happy with the yarn, even though it split unexpectedly on two occasions, but this was easily rectified.

Monday, 13 June 2011

Meandering Vines

It's off the needles, it's finished blocking and here it is....

Meandering Vines in Paton's UK Vintage











For further blog entries about the project, please look here (on blocking 


P.S. Now that I am the proud owner of a shawl, I will need to source a shawl pin.


Sunday, 12 June 2011

Meandering Vines by Susanna IC - Almost Finished...

According to an earlier blog entry, I began to work on "Meandering Vines" back in March 2011. It seems so long ago and I started several other projects whilst knitting the shawl.  

Meandering Vines


Finally, after three months of knitting on and off, it is finished. Well, ... almost finished. It's currently blocking. The shawl is knitted in a relatively thick cotton / acrylic yarn (Paton's UK Vintage) and blocking was an absolute must on this project.

The pattern is simple and straightforward, and, as promised by the designer, it can be knit in pretty much every type of yarn.  -   An easy knit for the beginner lace knitter.

My blocking method is a little quirky (see below). I neither own a blocking board, which would accommodate the full length of the shawl, nor do I have blocking pins, which would be strong enough to hold the fabric in place.

Meandering Vines in Patons UK Vintage - Blocking in Progress


Meandering Vines in Patons UK Vintage - Blocking in Progress


After some deliberation I decided to suspend the shawl with the help of two pegged coat - hangers from the top shelf of the wardrobe. The triangular corners on either side of the shawl are fastened to both sides of the wardrobe with the help of some scrap yarn (inserted in the eyelet stitches and then tied to the sides of the wardrobe). A further two coat hangers keep the garment in place at the bottom of the wardrobe.

Once this arrangement was in place, I lightly misted the garment with cold water.

Pictures of the blocked garment can be found here.

Sunday, 1 May 2011

Substituting Rowan Kidsilk Haze



Kidsilk Haze must be one of Rowan's bestselling yarns. As I am writing this entry, Kidsilk Haze has been stashed 11813 times on Ravelry, knitters have produced 14396 garments with the yarn and it's a consistent favourite amongst designers. I have personally met the yarn in my local yarn store, I have touched it, my eyes have feasted on the fantastic colourways in which it is produced and I regularly drool over photos of Kidsilk Haze and other yarns in the Kidsilk family when browsing through online yarn shops. Yes, there are several members in the Kidsilk family: Kidsilk Spray, Kidsilk Night and Kidsilk Aura, which I believe has now been discontinued. I love them all.

Rowan Kidsilk Haze


And yet, I have resisted buying Kidsilk Haze. I first came across Kidsilk Haze in a pattern book by Laura Harding. I had been knitting for a mere few months then and didn't know anything about yarn and the price tag that comes (quite rightly) with certain materials - Kidsilk Haze is a blend of Super Kid Mohair (70%) and Silk (30%). Blissfully ignorant, I looked it up on the internet and was quite simply taken aback by the price. Just about having completed my first fingerless glove in an awfully cheap acrylic yarn, I was after a yarn that was a bit more luxurious, yet affordable, a yarn with a purchase price, which I, an absolute beginner, could justify in case my project went horribly wrong. Therefore, I was unable to buy Kidsilk Haze. I didn't think my level of skill would do the expense and the beauty of the yarn justice.

Nevertheless, if I didn't allow myself Kidsilk Haze, I at least wanted something like Kidsilk Haze. And so the endless quest for a substitute had begun - alongside the perennial search for Kidsilk Haze at a knockdown price: That illusive skein of Kidsilk somewhere on sale for less than £3.50. (Yeah, I know...it's never going to happen.) Considering that 25g currently retail at just over £8.00, you are lucky if you are able to locate a skein for £5.95, and that would be in a discontinued colour, of which probably only one skein is held in stock. It has crossed my mind that instead of buying gold bullions for investment purposes, it might be just as prudent to have a few skeins of Kidsilk in your vault. I don't think prices for the stuff are about to drop any time soon and it might be a good hedge against inflation.



Patons UK Misty


In the light of all this praise, I need to make absolutely clear that I don't think any substitute not equivalent in materials will ever come close to Kidsilk, but this is not necessarily the task a cheaper alternative is supposed to fulfil. When substituting yarn in this particular case, I am aware that a cheaper alternative will produce an approximation in texture and look. I am perfectly happy with this - for the time being.

Patons UK Misty

After months of searching for this alternative, I found a possible candidate: Patons UK Misty, a blend of Mohair (70%) and Polyamide (30%) with a recommended needle size of 3.25 - 5.00mm (US: 3 - 8). Due to the Polyamide replacing the Silk content, Misty is a lot shinier than Kidsilk Haze. I haven't started to knit with Misty in earnest, but as far as first impressions go, I think Misty could be a frugal alternative. The yarn looks and feels luxurious. Whether it can live up to my expectations will soon be put to the test.




I have ten skeins of Misty in my stash and a few suitable patterns in mind. I will probably start swatching next weekend.  Ice Queen by Rosemary (Romi) Hill, which is available free on Knitty's website, or Branching Out by Susan Lawrence, a pattern which was the subject of a previous article and which is also available on Knitty's website, are two possible candidates.

Update: I decided to use Patons (UK) Misty for Citron by Hilary Smith Callis. For more on this, please have a look at my Citron blogpost.

Another update: I have used Misty for another project. This time, it was a stole designed by Cheryl Niamath. Project notes are now available on the blog. For a preview picture, please see below.

Wisp by Cheryl Niamath

Tuesday, 22 March 2011

Meandering Vines - Update

Just a brief update on Meandering Vines by Susanna IC (please see my previous blog entry for details on the pattern). The picture below shows what the shawl looks like in Paton's UK Vintage after three full pattern repeats on No 4 (UK) knitting needles, unblocked.



I am not sure whether the photo does it justice, as this was taken last night in fairly bad light. So far, I am happy with the outcome. Knitted with quite a bulky, textured yarn (70% Acrylic / 30% Cotton), the shawl has acquired a somewhat interesting texture, which almost has the appearance of a cabled pattern. I wonder to which degree this will be altered after the blocking is finished.

This brings me to another subject, I don't have the right blocking equipment at home. In fact, I have no proper blocking equipment at home and this project definitely requires blocking. I will either have to buy blocking pins or look around for some home - made alternatives. We shall see...

I haven't nearly progressed as much as I wanted to in respect of the shawl. I can excuse this partly as I was occupied with another side project: unravelling my first sweater and recycling the yarn. I didn't realise how time-consuming this was going to be, but all good fun and a post on the matter will follow shortly.
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