Showing posts with label Madelinetosh. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Madelinetosh. Show all posts

Thursday, 27 August 2015

Knitting with Non-Traditional Materials: The Nameless Choker meets the Nameless Cuff

Roughly one year ago I released project notes for a simple knitted lace choker, the Nameless Choker. The pattern notes for the 'Nameless Choker' are available here. 

Specifically designed to use up the last remnants of sock yarn after the completion of a larger project, Nameless is an ideal project for a very small quantity of yarn (approximately 10 - 20 grams).


Nameless Choker, Knitting Pattern available here


One year on, I decided to explore the choice of material for this project in more detail. Whilst certain types of sock and cotton yarn (especially the sturdier varieties) work very well with the design, the pattern provides an ideal starting point for venturing into new territory, i.e. the cross-over point where knitting and jewellery-making techniques meet and blend into one another. 

For my revision of the pattern, I am planning to adapt the original design with the help of a number of non-traditional materials such as waxed cotton thong cord (1mm), leather cord (1mm) and, potentially, jewellery wires.

Having completed an initial experiment with waxed cotton cord (shown below), it is clear that certain design elements  of the original pattern (stitch count, lace repeats, needle size and quantities etc.) will obviously have to be revised and modified to take the properties of cotton thread into consideration, but I am quite happy with the initial outcome.

The first insight derived from yesterday's cotton cord knitting session is that 10 metres of waxed cotton thong are not sufficient to produce a fully fledged knitted choker on the basis of the original Nameless pattern, but they will be enough to make a knitted wrist cuff.   

Nameless Cuff (knitted with 1mm waxed cotton cord)


Nameless Cuff (knitted with 1mm waxed cotton cord)


Nameless Cuff (knitted with 1mm waxed cotton cord)

Nameless Cuff Prototype

Nameless Cuff - Prototype

Further updates and finalised project notes on the Nameless Cuff and the modified Nameless Choker will be up on the blog shortly. 

In the meantime, stay tuned... 





Thursday, 11 September 2014

Free Pattern: The Nameless Choker

Nameless


The Nameless Choker is a simple and quick lace project, specifically designed to use up a small quantity of sock yarn (approximately 10 - 20 grams), i.e. roughly the amount of yarn you might have lying around following the completion of a larger project. The quantity of yarn I used for my choker hardly registered on my set of kitchen scales and the above estimate is rather conservative.

It is also an ideal pattern for beginner lace knitters, wishing to get to grips with two of the most common knitting decreases (k2tog and ssk), without having to commit too much time or too many resources; or for all those knitters who enjoy creating knitted accessories and jewellery, either for themselves or for others.


Materials

You will require the following materials:

  • approximately 10 - 20 grams of sock yarn (for my choker I used Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light Sock Yarn in Victorian Gothic)
  • 3mm knitting needles (or the size specified by the yarn manufacturer)
  • scissors
  • darning needle 
  • 2 buttons 

Nameless Choker in Progress

Gauge

Gauge is not essential for this project but you should have a rough idea of how stretchy your chosen yarn is. This is a made-to-measure project, and as neck circumferences differ, you will have to regularly check whether your choker has reached the desired length. If you decide to knit this project with an unfamiliar yarn and you are not entirely sure how far it will stretch after blocking, it may be beneficial to knit a small gauge swatch and block this in order to get an idea of how the yarn will behave and, most importantly, to check its stretch.


Nameless Choker in Progress



Project Instructions

  • Set - up:

    • Cast on 12 stitches, using whichever cast-on method you are most comfortable with.
    • Knit 4 rows

Once you have completed the set - up, you are ready to start on the lace sequence of the pattern:

  • Lace Pattern:

Row 1: K3, YO, K1, K2tog, SSK, K1, YO, K3
Row 2: K2, P8, K2
Row 3: Repeat Row 1
Row 4: Repeat Row 2

Keep repeating the above sequence until both ends of the choker almost meet, when it is fitted for measuring. Bearing in mind that the choker should fit relatively tightly around the neck, I left a gap approximately as wide as the top of my index finger to allow for a snug fit following blocking. 

When your choker has reached the desired length, stop knitting the lace sequence on a purl row. Next, continue knitting three rows in garter stitch and proceed to bind off.

Nameless in Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light (Victorian Gothic)
  • Blocking:

Blocking your choker is an absolute must in order to open up the lace. I opted for wet-blocking.

  • Finishing:
Following blocking, it is time to sew in ends and to add two buttons for fastening the choker. The buttons can be attached to either end of the choker. I decided to place mine on the cast - off edge, as this usually turns out slightly wider, directly underneath the openings of the yarn over increases. The  first holes created by the yarn over increases on the opposite end will serve as button holes.

Your choker is ready to be worn. 

Nameless in Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light (Victorian Gothic) 

Enjoy!

! Update: One year, I am revisiting the Nameless Choker. I am currently in the process of adapting the pattern to non-traditional knitting materials (cotton thread / leather etc). More on this venture is available here. !


For pattern support, please feel free to contact me via Ravelry (ClariceAsquith), Twitter (@Slipstitched), leave a comment below or by e-mail: clarice.asquith@googlemail.com.

This pattern is for personal use only and may not be reproduced for commercial purposes without permission.

An update on knitting a variation of this pattern (pictured below) with non-traditional materials is available here


Nameless Cuff, More here.


Nameless Cuff, More here.

© 2014 Clarice Asquith. All rights reserved. http://makedoandmendnovice.blogspot.com

Friday, 8 August 2014

Those remnants of precious sock yarn



Choker in Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light 

Following completion of a project, all of us are faced with the challenge of putting yarn left overs to good use. Some of my spare yarn gets turned into swatches and smaller amounts end up as stitch markers. Yet, in the case of precious sock yarn, I always try to create a small pattern specifically designed for the amount of surplus yarn.

The remnants of the Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light, which I used for the Freestyle Raglan Cardigan, were turned into a choker. 


Sunday, 11 May 2014

The Freestyle Raglan Cardigan - Project Instructions

Surprisingly pleased with my first freestyle raglan cardigan, I decided to knit another, this time keeping a record of my project instructions.



Knitted seamlessly from the top down, this is a made to measure project without a written pattern as such. 

The number of cast - on stitches depends on your gauge swatch, your own measurements, the chosen needle size and the type of wool you are using. The pattern allows for modifications at every step of the way and what follows are my instructions for a cardigan in size S, knitted in stockinette stitch, with garter stitch edging at the bottom.

Should you wish to use another stitch motif, you simply have to knit the gauge swatch in the desired stitch and derive your measurements from your test swatch.






I used the following materials:

  • Yarn: Madelinetosh, Tosh Merino Light (Sock Yarn) - 1 hank

  • Needle: 5mm (US size 8) circular needle, 4 double - pointed needles (5mm / US size 8)

  • Scrap yarn, 4 stitch markers, scissors, darning needle 



Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light Sock Yarn, Colourway: Victorian Gothic



Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light Sock Yarn, Colourway: Victorian Gothic


Prepare your gauge swatch and block it in whichever way you see fit. Count the stitches and calculate the number of stitches against the measurement of the gauge swatch: In my gauge swatch, 26 stitches in stockinette stitch measured 10cm exactly. 


Gauge swatch in stockinette stitch.



Next, you will have to determine how many stitches are required for the neckline of your cardigan. You can either measure yourself or, as this is not always as straightforward, opt to measure the neckline of an existing garment. My neckline measurement was 51cm.

Once you have determined the neckline measurement, you calculate the number of stitches to be cast on proportionally:

The general calculation looks as follows:

(measurement of desired neckline x number of stitches in swatch sample) / measurement of swatch = number of required stitches 

For my cardigan, the calculation looks like this: 

(51cm x 26sts) / 10cm = 132.6sts


I rounded the stitch total to 135, in order to easily divide the stitches between the various sections.


Once you have determined the number of stitches required, you are ready to start knitting:



Cast on 135 stitches:

  • 1st row: knit all stitches
  • 2nd row: purl all stitches

(After completion of this row, I decided to incorporate a button hole at the beginning of the next row, but this is entirely optional.)

Next, divide stitches between markers for the front, back and the two sleeve sections: 

  • 45 for the back section, 46 in total for the front sections and 22 stitches for each sleeve section
  • 3rd row: knit 23, place marker, knit 22, place marker, knit 45, place marker, knit 22, place marker, knit 23
  • 4th row: purl, slipping markers as you complete the row

From the next row onwards, you start the Raglan increases. Until you are able to fit your arms comfortably through the sleeve sections, the number of stitches will have to be increased as set out below.

  • 5th row: knit to two stitches before 1st marker, kfb, knit, slip marker, kfb, knit to two stitches before next marker. Continue increasing the stitch count as set-out above until the row row is complete, increasing one stitch before and after each marker.
  • 6th row: purl all stitches slipping markers as you complete the row


Continue in stockinette stitch, increasing stitches before and after each marker on every knit row as shown above.

Continue knitting in stockinette stitch until your arms fit through the sleeves. (I increased the sleeve sections from 22 stitches to a total of 45 stitches between markers.) 

When the sleeves are wide enough and the fit is comfortable, proceed as follows:

  • Knit to 1st marker, remove marker, place all stitches between markers on scrap yarn. Remove second marker. Join first front section with back section, continue knitting to second sleeve section, remove first marker, place stitches between markers on scrap yarn, remove second marker, join back section with second front section. Proceed to knit until end of row. 


Proceed to knit in stockinette stitch, removing all markers until your cardigan has reached the desired length. (You will have to keep checking the fit of the cardigan whilst knitting.)

Once your cardigan has reached the desired length, knit 4 rows in plain garter stitch (to avoid rolled edges) and bind off.






Having completed the Torso, it's time to move on to the sleeves: 

As pictured above, the live sleeve stitches are held on scrap yarn. Divide these stitches evenly between 3 double - pointed needles and remove the scrap yarn. To give the sleeves a neater look and to avoid the appearance of "underarm holes", pick up a few stitches underneath the arms, where the front and back sections were originally joined. This will stabilise the sleeve and create an overall tidy appearance.

It is now up to you to decide, how long the sleeves should be. As I wanted to use one skein of sock yarn exactly, I settled for short sleeves, which only required me to knit three rows in the round until bind-off. 

Once you have completed the sleeves, your cardigan is ready to be blocked.

As this garment is knitted in one piece, blocking can be quite a challenge and I decided to pin it against my dressmaker's dummy, whilst steam - blocking the fabric.  






Should you require pattern support, please feel free to contact me via Ravelry or leave a comment below.

This pattern is for personal use only and may not be reproduced for commercial purposes without permission.


© 2012 Clarice Asquith. All rights reserved. http://makedoandmendnovice.blogspot.com



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