Showing posts with label knitting. Show all posts
Showing posts with label knitting. Show all posts

Thursday, 5 October 2017

Knitting for Dollcena Dolls

... can be tedious. It's not so much the knitting, rather the finishing, which can be extremely time-consuming. 

But this Dollcena urgently needed a comfy outfit. 


Takara Tomy Doruchena / Dollcena Doll (Lilo) - handknit dressing gown




Takara Tomy, Doruchena / Dollcena Doll (Lilo) - handknitted gown


Sunday, 6 September 2015

Unravelling Old Projects: Musings on Reckless Beginner Knitting and Body Image

In the interest of frugality, I will be unravelling a project from the very early stages of my 'knitting career'. This was a time when knitting a gauge swatch was such a bore, adequate measuring (of myself and the swatch) appeared mysterious and incredibly complicated, blocking didn't exist and, due to a lack of familiarity with materials, I habitually chose the most unsuitable yarns for my projects. 

Hopelessly Oversized Asymmetrical Cardigan (completed circa 2010 / 2011)

I'm sure many other beginner knitters will be familiar with this cavalier attitude: You feel excited by the very fact that you mastered the basics of knitting and you just want to get on with it. Every project therefore turns into a test, attempting new techniques and more challenging pieces, rather than paying attention to the necessary groundwork, i.e. jumping through the hoops of all the preparatory steps before casting-on in earnest.  


I adopted this rather nonchalant attitude in two of my earliest projects: a jumper and an asymmetrical cardigan. And even though every seasoned knitter drew my attention to the importance of gauge, selecting suitable materials or the necessity of blocking, I chose to ignore all of this well-intentioned advice, knowing in the back of my mind that I was en route to Disappointment Central.


Wednesday, 2 September 2015

OMG it's huge: The Picot Pi is finally blocking

A long overdue update on the Picot Pi


It's finally blocking. And, as expected, it's huge.

Bed vs Picot Pi: 


Picot Pi Blocking



Detailed pattern notes will be up on the blog shortly. More information on the project is available here.


Picot Pi Lace Detail

Sunday, 30 August 2015

Winter Stole Update: Test Knit Completed ✔

Back in January I released my pattern notes for the Winter Stole, a lace stole knitted with a chunky alpaca / wool blend on 6mm needles. More background on the rationale behind the design and my choice of yarn is available here; and the pattern is available here.


The Winter Stole pattern was developed to encourage knitters (and myself) to diversify the choice of materials when knitting lace. Depending, of course, on the complexity of the lace stitch sequence and the overall design, I was aiming to showcase that it is possible to produce knitted lace with chunkier yarns. 

Winter Stole (yarn: Wendy Zena, pattern available here.


Winter Stole (yarn: Wendy Zena, pattern available here.

Thanks to Tara (tara53aus on Ravelry) I am now pleased to announce that the pattern has undergone its first 'independent' test knit and Tara's completed stole is pictured below:


Tara's Completed Winter Stole 

Regular readers of this blog will know that I am always thankful for the feedback I receive from the knitters of my designs, especially from those, who put their trust in a pattern that has so far only been completed by the pattern's very own designer. This was the case with the Winter Stole pattern. 


This time round and following the feedback I received from Tara, I am particularly pleased to announce that my original Winter Stole pattern is free of mistakes, slips and no modifications are necessary.


Tara's Stole Blocking

I was also delighted to see that Tara not only used a natural, undyed alpaca yarn to complete her stole, she also chose a very special handspun yarn from an independent producer in Western Australia. 


Sadly, I was not able to retrieve more information on the producer over the web, but the ball band details can be seen in the picture below. So, if you are located in Western Australia, I suggest you get your hands on a delightful skein (or two) of Greg's and Wendy's handspun.




A remark on the pattern from my side: I have decided to update the pattern notes of the Winter Stole slightly with optional variations, to take those knitters into consideration, who are opting to use handspun yarn (Alpaca or otherwise) and may thus only have a finite amount of yarn to complete the project. The stole was designed to be rather wide and fewer cast-on stitches (resulting in fewer lace motif repeats in the body of the piece) will ensure that the piece will turn out long enough to be classed a 'stole'. These notes on modifications of the original pattern will be published shortly. In the meantime, the original Winter Stole pattern is available here.

Finally and once again, a very big 'THANK YOU!' to Tara for her feedback, for being the first to test the pattern and for choosing a delicious, independently produced, handspun yarn to complete her project. 

For any interested knitters, wishing to complete a Winter Stole and requiring pattern support, please feel free to contact me via Ravelry (ClariceAsquith), Twitter (@Slipstitched), leave a comment below or by e-mail: clarice.asquith@googlemail.com.


For a link collection to all original designs on the blog, please visit this link.

Thursday, 27 August 2015

Knitting with Non-Traditional Materials: The Nameless Choker meets the Nameless Cuff

Roughly one year ago I released project notes for a simple knitted lace choker, the Nameless Choker. The pattern notes for the 'Nameless Choker' are available here. 

Specifically designed to use up the last remnants of sock yarn after the completion of a larger project, Nameless is an ideal project for a very small quantity of yarn (approximately 10 - 20 grams).


Nameless Choker, Knitting Pattern available here


One year on, I decided to explore the choice of material for this project in more detail. Whilst certain types of sock and cotton yarn (especially the sturdier varieties) work very well with the design, the pattern provides an ideal starting point for venturing into new territory, i.e. the cross-over point where knitting and jewellery-making techniques meet and blend into one another. 

For my revision of the pattern, I am planning to adapt the original design with the help of a number of non-traditional materials such as waxed cotton thong cord (1mm), leather cord (1mm) and, potentially, jewellery wires.

Having completed an initial experiment with waxed cotton cord (shown below), it is clear that certain design elements  of the original pattern (stitch count, lace repeats, needle size and quantities etc.) will obviously have to be revised and modified to take the properties of cotton thread into consideration, but I am quite happy with the initial outcome.

The first insight derived from yesterday's cotton cord knitting session is that 10 metres of waxed cotton thong are not sufficient to produce a fully fledged knitted choker on the basis of the original Nameless pattern, but they will be enough to make a knitted wrist cuff.   

Nameless Cuff (knitted with 1mm waxed cotton cord)


Nameless Cuff (knitted with 1mm waxed cotton cord)


Nameless Cuff (knitted with 1mm waxed cotton cord)

Nameless Cuff Prototype

Nameless Cuff - Prototype

Further updates and finalised project notes on the Nameless Cuff and the modified Nameless Choker will be up on the blog shortly. 

In the meantime, stay tuned... 





Sunday, 23 August 2015

Cartridge Rib Stitch in the Round + Cat = Cat Leg Warmer



Cartridge Rib Stitch in the Round + Cat = Cat Leg Warmer

The blog seems to have received a number of search queries for instructions to the cartridge rib stitch motif knitted in the round. This is potentially the result of an earlier entry, in which I posted the stitch sequence for the basic cartridge rib stitch. This is available here.


Catridge Rib Stitch Sample in the Round

Sunday, 26 July 2015

Going Full Circle: The Picot Pi Shawl is OFF THE NEEDLES


According to Elizabeth Zimmermann, we should be knitting circular shawls during the summer months, and that's exactly what I have done. Below is a first glimpse of my Pi Shawl variation, based on Zimmermann's timeless Pi Shawl pattern.



I haven't counted the picot bobbles of my Pi and keeping track of the exact stitch count in the final stages of my pattern is not essential, but I estimate that the Picot Pi's final bind-off row consisted of over three thousand stitches, when including the additional cast-on stitches. More on the Picot bind-off technique is available here

The completion of the knit was further delayed by having to find a more or less suitable yarn substitute for Regia (4 ply silk), as I was running out shortly after starting the last row. And although my knitting cupboard is home to many treasures, it may at times take a while to retrieve these. It appears somewhat crammed in there at the moment.


Pickle invading the cupboard and getting comfy...as usual

Saturday, 4 July 2015

The Weekly Swatch: The Star Stitch

Star Stitch - Swatch Knitted with Sock Yarn

The Star Stitch is a simple lace stitch. All of the in- and decreases are worked on the wrong side, i.e. the purl-side. The right side rows are knitted throughout. 

This stitch motif produces a meshy texture, making it an ideal stitch for summer garments and accessories. 

Star Stitch Swatch Sample with Araucania Botany Lace Sock Yarn

Saturday, 27 June 2015

The Picot Bind-Off: It's a love-hate relationship

I'm in the process of finishing the Picot Pi and (as the name suggests) I'm binding off picot-style. At over one thousand stitches, this is a lengthy and repetitive process. But, the end result will be worth the wait.

Picot literally means 'small loop' and describes the bobbles at the cast-off edge, which are produced by adding more stitches immediately before binding off. Incorporating the picot bind-off will result in a very flexible, wider garment at the outer edge of the piece. In other words, it adds drape.

Picot Bind-Off Detail for Ammonite 

Sunday, 15 March 2015

Cartridge Rib Stitch Baktus - Project Instructions

As promised in my last post, here are the project instructions for the Cartridge Rib Stitch Baktus. 


Garter Stitch Baktus in Araucania Botany Lace 


This project was a modification of the ever popular Baktus pattern by Strikkelise, which is available here. Just like the original, the Catridge Rib Baktus is designed to use exactly one skein of sock yarn. The needle size is up to you and gauge is not important. Happy days!


Garter Stitch Baktus in Araucania Botany Lace 

Sunday, 8 March 2015

Another Brain Cleanser - Baktus in Cartridge Rib


Almost one year ago, I was busy knitting my first baktus (a triangular scarf in garter stitch throughout). The pattern for the original baktus can be found here. I highly recommend it as a brain cleanser project. For those occasions when you wish to knit, but lack the desire for a serious challenge. For those occasions, it's an ideal base project. 

Due to its simplicity, the pattern inspires to play around. If you feel like trying new techniques (knitting with multiple colours, cabling, basic lace and so on), then the baktus should be on your list of 'go-to-patterns'.


Garter Stitch Baktus

Sunday, 15 February 2015

Knitting is a Slippery Slope

Welcome to the "wonderful" world of vintage knitting patterns, British vintage knitting patterns, to be precise...




Sunday, 11 January 2015

Knitting Lace with Chunky Alpaca Yarn



Admittedly, to a sock yarn lover the above might not sound particularly intriguing. As a sock yarn connoisseur myself, I have to admit that the idea of knitting simple lace with a chunky alpaca / wool blend did not seem appealing. Nevertheless, in the interest of reducing the size of my yarn stash, I decided to embark on this adventure some time in late 2014. 


Winter Stole in Progress (Yarn: Wendy Zena)

Sunday, 16 November 2014

New Free Pattern: The Commuter Cowl

Evening Rush Hour London Victoria

Another experiment in simple lace knitting. This project was conceived of and completed during the daily commute and that's how it came to its name, the Commuter Cowl. 

The cowl's lace pattern gives the impression of vertical ribbing, which is achieved by a simple lace sequence, ideal for beginner lace knitters.

The project is extremely portable and the pattern's lace rows are followed by simple knit rows, making this an ideal beginner project. The cowl is knitted entirely in the round.


Saturday, 15 November 2014

Update on that "Bag of Weed"

My so-called "sabbatical" ended unexpectedly at the onset of October. This accounts for the silence on the blog, which I'm about to interrupt with a post on blocking.

Blocking again! I don't seem to be able to get away from the topic of blocking.

Commuter Cowl blocking, draped around dressmaker's dummy

Saturday, 27 September 2014

Why Knitting for Charity? Why Knitting for Pine Ridge?


The onset of yet another Age UK / Innocent Big Knit campaign prompted me to start reflecting on charity knitting. Perhaps, I should mention that the topic of charitable knitting is vast: Some charity knitters specialise in particular accessories required by hospital patients, those in remission or patients with chronic conditions. Others knit for animal shelters. Some of us also produce custom-made items, clothes for birds after oil spills, for example. I also thought of those knitters, who produce clothing for premature babies and especially those of us, who cast-on for baby burial gowns.

Talking about charity knitting can thus come across as bleak, and this is perhaps one of the reasons why I've so far always refrained from writing about it. After all, this blog is intended to be my creative leisure pad. I'm also aware that knitters generally have strong opinions when it comes to discussions on charitable knitting, with some of us raising the question whether there is a place for charitable knitting in this day and age, given the abundance of mass-produced clothing. 



Badlands, Pine Ridge Reservation, Photo: Patrice Ouellet, more here.

Friday, 26 September 2014

On the topic of Charity Knitting...The Big Knit is back!

The Big Knit is back for 2014. Needless to say, it's one of my favourite fund-raising campaigns, but as a knitter you may rightfully accuse me of partiality.

For all those, who are not familiar with the Big Knit, it's an established, large-scale,  fundraising campaign, which takes full advantage of the good nature, creativity and reliability of the knitting community. 

Innocent / Age UK, Big Knit 2014. 

Thursday, 25 September 2014

Waldorf Knitting Patterns

An advertising leaflet for the local Steiner Kindergarten / School in Canterbury came through my letterbox a few weeks ago. Due to the lack of offspring of my own, the advertising was completely lost on this household, but it prompted me to think of the Steiner Curriculum, in which knitting still forms an integral part. It also reminded me of the traditional Waldorf dolls, which I vaguely remember from my childhood.

The examples below, even though some of the projects displayed are Waldorf-inspired rather than original Waldorf patterns, provide an idea of the kind of style I have in mind. Further details on these are available here. 

Waldorf and Waldorf - Inspired knitting projects on Pinterest. Available here.

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